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Are you like your Bird Dog?

Tram & I pause for a photo on a sunny pheasant hunt without a cattail in sight

We’ve probably all heard the sayings about owners and their dogs looking alike, but what about shared mannerisms?  I’ll venture our bird dogs mimic their hunting masters in a variety of ways.  Here’s a sample of the similarities and adaptions I believe my shorthair, Trammell, and I share.

 

  • Methodically Short and Deliberately Dainty.  I am not the tallest guy in the room, any room, even an 8th grade classroom.  At 5’ 7”, my short legs work harder than most to cover the fields and forests.  Thankfully, my shorthair works slower and more methodical than other pointers I’ve observed.  Amongst my Pheasants Forever co-workers, Trammell is referred to as a “dainty” hunter.  To some guys, those may be fighting words, but I’m pretty sure Tram and I bag more roosters than those China Shop Bulls.  We may not vacuum up big expanses of ground, but I’m relatively certain we don’t run over too many hunkered birds either. 

 

  • Hunting Marathoners.  While Tram and I may not beat many tag teams to their daily limit, our deliberate pace does allow us to hunt from the day’s sunrise to the day’s closing bell.

 

  • Cattail Skirters.  Unless one of us gets “birdy,” we’re both content to work the outside edge of the cattail sloughs and keep our feet dry. 

 

  • Rain, Rain, Go Away.  Speaking of dry feet, Tram and I both avoid being outside on rainy days.  It’s funny to watch Tram go outside for a potty break in the rain, she tip toes into the yard as if she’s literally melting and zooms back inside the minute her “business” is complete.  Likewise, I’ve been quoted as saying “this isn’t fun for me anymore,” during a rainy hunt.

 

  • No Water Wings.  While I love to eat ducks, I’d rather spend my time and energy walking in pursuit of any bird without webbed feet.  Tram has a similar aversion to spending her hunting hours stuck in the mud over plastic fake birds when the real thing is to be had one step in front of the other.

 

  • Favorite Color is Orange.  Hunter orange and Detroit Tigers orange compose our wardrobe’s two seasons.

 

  • Birdy Buddies.  Probably most important of all is our shared affinity for upland birds; including, pheasants, quail, grouse, woodcock, sharpies, and prairie chickens.

 

 

What about you?  What traits do you and your bird dog share?

 

The Pointer is written by Bob St.Pierre, Pheasants Forever’s Vice President of Marketing.  Follow Bob on Twitter @BobStPierre.

 

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4 Responses to “Are you like your Bird Dog?”

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  1. Scott LaPlante says:

    My oldest shorthair and I have a few similarities:
    - Neither of us like the heat…and that is anything north of 50 degrees.
    - Oceans of prairie grass are our favorite, and we can spend all day running.
    - We both are crazy when it comes the chasing upland birds.
    - We can both irritate my wife (for no apparent reason).

    I am hoping to have a few more adventures next season. I have been invited to southern Kansas for quail in the late season. I have another open invite to northern Nevada for wild chukar.

  2. Rhonda Wiley says:

    Ariana and I both get excited just watching the geese fly over….
    We both LOVE to swim!!!!
    We both can’t wait to get home from work in the evenings….
    We both love to eat all birds…..pheasant, quail, goose, chicken…..
    We both love to agrevate my husband….
    He says we are both hard headed….
    We both disagree with him….

  3. Grant Vaskey says:

    Our dog, Broom, a Vizsla, and are are so similar it is sometimes scary. I’d rather not publish the traits we share, as they are not the most desirable in a gun dog, nor in humans. But, there is an upside. I travel quite a bit for work, and with my great wife watching the dogs, she gets a little of me through our lil princess when I’m gone.

  4. Nathan says:

    my GSP is the same way with rain. he REFUSES to go outside and do his thing when it is raining, even if it means he has to hold it for a day.

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