Archive for the ‘Dogs’ Category

Dog of the Day: “Alley”

Monday, July 28th, 2014

Alley

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“Alley,” affectionately known as Alleygirl, was the best pheasant hunting dog Kerry Pettit ever had. “She never lost a bird,” Kerry says of Alley, who passed away last year at the age of 13. Pictured with Kerry (above) are his sons, Gaige and Zander.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Nadeleine”

Friday, July 25th, 2014

Nadeleine

Mountain Star Nadeleine, shown here at a training session, is Sandy Klein’s Irish red and white setter.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Stella”

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Stella

Garrett Mikrut and his 3-year-old German shorthaired pointer, “Stella,” found these ruffed grouse last season. “She pointed one bird 100 yards in the woods. When I approached, the grouse flushed and Stella retrieved the bird.  On the way back to the trail, Stella pointed the second grouse and she retrieved that one as well,” Mikrut says.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Max”

Monday, July 21st, 2014

Max

“Max” was Donald Armstrong’s 7-year-old German shorthaired pointer. Unfortunately, Max passed away following a car accident earlier this year. “He was a great pheasant dog and good duck dog in the blind,” Armstrong says.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Penny”

Friday, July 18th, 2014

Penny - Copy

Bruce Hood and his Chesapeake Bay retriever, “Penny,” made a trip to Alberta, Canada to hunt pheasants last fall.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Chip”

Thursday, July 17th, 2014

Chip

“Chip” is Erik Griffin’s 6-month-old chocolate Labrador retriever. The pair, from Crookston, Minn., is currently working on obedience training and upland hunting scenarios. “Chip has shown excitement and the drive for hunting of a dog well beyond his years. I look forward to working with him this hunting season,” Griffin says.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Koda”

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Koda

Steve Laney and “Koda,” his 3-year-old English pointer, worked hard last season hunting roosters on public land in northwest Iowa. This picture was taken after a good day of hunting in December.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

A Few More Tips for Adding a Second Dog

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

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We had four or five male dogs for many years, overlapping generations without ever having problems. Their ages were spread out, and we never had more than one male intact. The last go-around changed everything when the youngest male reached about a year old and we had two intact males in the house. Play turned rough one day and the two were at it in a full blown dog fight before we realized what was happening. We neutered the younger one and developed several strategies for keeping life calm. Most of the time they are fine, but occasionally they still get edgy with each other.

Bringing a puppy into the house when you already have an older dog requires careful introduction and supervision until Dog #1 clearly accepts the puppy and the puppy learns its place in the household routines. Down the road, however, when the puppy becomes Dog #2, other measures may be needed to be sure life in the household stays smooth.

Also read: Five Tips for Adding a Second Bird Dog

Fortunately, there are all kinds of “pack management” tactics that keep everyone – dogs and people – happy. The key to most of them is simply knowing our dogs, being able to read their signals, and being able to identify triggers for confrontation.  A lot of our tactics are simple obedience issues, most of which reinforce the fact that we – the people – are dominant. Here are a few employed in our house:

  • When it comes to meal time or play time, we do not let the excitement level escalate. If they start to bark and spin and jump in each others’ faces, we issue a “whoa” then “sit” before they are let out or given their bowls. To avoid the out-of-control race downstairs every morning, the most excitable one must wait at the top of the stairs until released after the other three have been let outside. Humans always pass through the door first if we’re all going out together.
  • If the two start posturing or showing any signs that could develop into aggression, a sharp “cut it” or “leave it” command interrupts the behavior. Another option is to divert the behavior into something else. For example, if the two have been separated for a while, as when one goes on a hunting trip and the other stays home, the older one always wants to re-establish his dominance and gives a low growl when the younger one (who sometimes seems dumber than a box of rocks) jams right into his face to say hello. Simple solution – I put a bumper in the younger one’s mouth before they greet each other which turns his thoughts to play and he bounds away. Another diversion is to call one or both into a “heel” and move them out of that space. Or go directly to the treat jar which distracts the whole pack.
  • Our dogs are allowed the run of the house when no one is home, but those two are separated by rooms. The overzealous eater dines in the bathroom or pantry. No bowls are left on the floor other than the communal water bowl. And only two dogs are allowed to play with a toy or generally wrestle at a time – no threesomes.

This pack management requires more attention than with our dogs in the past, but so much of our daily life is filled with routines that knowing which part of the routines need extra attention has become habit. Most of all, we make sure each dogs gets his equal share of love, bed space, hunting time and songs. Dogs never complain when you’re off key; they appreciate the melody either way.

Nancy Anisfield, an outdoor photographer/writer, sporting dog enthusiast and bird hunter, serves on Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever’s National Board of Directors. She resides in Hinesburg, Vermont.

Dog of the Day: “Casey”

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Casey

Norton’s Odyssey Twilight, call name “Casey,” is Ian Pizey’s 5-year-old German shorthaired pointer. “She loves to hunt and retrieve, and has proven herself on ruffed grouse and woodcock in Ontario and sharptails and Huns in North Dakota,” Pizey says, “But my favorite times with Casey are in South Dakota looking for ringnecks.” Casey has also been to Nebraska and Texas in pursuit of quail.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

Dog of the Day: “Hank”

Monday, July 14th, 2014

Hank

“Hank,” Michael Sousa’s German shorthaired pointer, had that all-business look on their first outing together.

Have your own bird dog photo you’d like to share? Email it to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.