Posts Tagged ‘anthony hauck’

Hey, Nice “Pocket Rocket”…And Other Bird Dog Breed Nicknames

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

English cocker spaniels like the author's "Sprig" are often called "pocket rockets," pocket describing their size and rocket describing their drive. Photo by Anthony Hauck / Pheasants Forever

English cocker spaniels like the author’s “Sprig” are often called “pocket rockets,” pocket describing their size and rocket describing their drive. Photo by Anthony Hauck / Pheasants Forever

I consider nicknames terms of endearment, so please don’t be offended when I call your:

English cocker spaniel a “Pocket Rocket”

English setter a “Shag”

Labrador retriever a “Meat Dog”

German Wirehair an “Ugly Dog”

Golden Retriever a “Swamp Collie”

Pudelpointer a “Wookie”

Vizsla a “Velcro Dog”

Weimaraner a “Ghost Dog”

What bird dog breed nicknames am I missing?

Anthony’s Antics Afield is written by Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.organd follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauckPF.

The Best Compliment for a Bird Hunter: I Want a Bird Dog like Yours

Friday, January 25th, 2013

Me with my pride and joy, Trammell, a German shorthaired pointer

Me with my pride and joy, Trammell, a German shorthaired pointer

Last autumn, on a bird hunting trip with Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s online editor, we stopped by my brother’s house in Rhinelander, Wisconsin.  Anthony’s little nugget of a bird dog, “Sprig,” was in tow.

 

Sprig, an English cocker spaniel, made fast friends with my niece, nephew, and brother.  So much so that my sister-in-law, Julie, said that Sprig might be just the ticket for helping push my brother over the ledge to adding a bird dog to their busy family.  We ventured further on the trip to Escanaba, Michigan where both my parents also offered to “take Sprig off Anthony’s hands.”

 

While “nice shot,” is always an appreciated sentiment on a pheasant hunt, I don’t think there is any greater compliment for a bird hunter than a fellow hunter remarking “I want a bird dog like yours.”  For all the trials of potty training and the tribulations of obedience afield, bird dogs provide the greatest rewards when others appreciate the fruits of your labor.

 

Although my immediate family seems fixated on Anthony’s Sprig, I’ve been honored to have many hunting partners comment on their desire to have a shorthair like my “Trammell” pup.  A few have even gone so far as to connect with Trammell’s breeder and seek out her bloodlines through Top Gun Kennels.  That’s a fact I’m flattered by . . . although Top Gun’s breeding has more to do with Trammell’s prowess than any training I accomplished.

 

At its foundation, following the bloodlines of a bird dog you enjoy hunting behind is a great formula for finding a bird dog pup that you’ll cherish for a decade and more.  Have you ever pursued the pup or breeding of a hunting partner’s stellar bird dog?

 

The Pointer is written by Bob St.Pierre, Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever’s Vice President of Marketing.  Follow Bob on Twitter @BobStPierre and listen to Bob and Billy Hildebrand every Saturday morning on FAN Outdoors radio on KFAN FM100.3.

 

Anthony’s Best of 2009 Volume I

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Dana

The author's sister Dana with her first bounty of roosters.

It’s human nature to catalog life’s events, and the end of the year seems a perfect time to do such a thing. Here’s Anthony Hauck’s “Best Of 2009 Volume I.”

• Witnessing my Pheasants Forever colleague and friend, as well as co-host of the FAN Outdoors radio show, Bob St.Pierre, hauling in a monster muskie on Lake Minnetonka. Bob checks in at 5′ 7″, and the muskellunge was 48″, so that means the fish was three inches longer than Bob is tall. Sorry Bob, just another one of my fish tales, because I’m jealous…

• My brother Sean’s first ruffed grouse trip – all the way to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula – resulted in some classic moments, many not suitable for print. However, my younger cohort is riding perfection when it comes to the thunder chickens, going a perfect three for three. Woodcock? Well, you said you don’t like woodcock anyways, Sean.

• Pheasants Forever’s Rick Young and I left the Twin Cities at 5:30 PM on Monday, November 9th headed to a Pheasants Forever event in Fort Benton, Montana. Naturally, our intent was to get there early so we could hunt. One Dairy Queen blizzard, five energy drinks, one fuel crisis, 1,000 miles and 16 hours later, we loaded our shotguns and headed out to hunt the Pheasants Forever Coffee Creek BLOCK Management (Montana’s public access program) area. After all that, sliding my first Montana rooster into my vest was especially rewarding, an experience only intensified by dehydration and sleep deprivation-induced delirium.

• Sister Dana, welcome to the hunting party! Congratulations on your first rooster! You also make mean chocolate chip and banana pancakes. You’ll make somebody a good wife some day, but just remember, they have to get by me first.

• The fall hunting beard will be an annual tradition for this outdoorsman. Three plus months sans razor has been what can only be described as a religious experience. Heck, I’m so attached to it – literally and figuratively – that I may make it a year-round look. And an ugly look at that.

• Line of 2009 has to go to Pheasants Forever’s Andrew Vavra, who, after chastising me the evening prior for merely contemplating catching a few more zzz’s and duck hunting at a later hour, dropped this doosy on me when I tried to rustle him at 5:30 AM: “We wouldn’t be any less of men if we didn’t go.” Get up, Andrew!

• Friend Donald “Donnie” W. Kundel wearing a cowboy hat while dove hunting. Since I’ve got my 5-gallon lid now, look out dove fields, because next September 1 is the reunion tour for Montgomery (Donnie) and Gentry (me), live and in action. We at least put the “try” in country.

• A hard day of deer hunting. No deer, in fact, spotted. Nothing to raise the spirits quite like a Clint Eastwood flick. Thank you “Outlaw Josie Wales.” Mom, Dad, Sean, Dana and cousin Jake and three hours of family time. Now that, as they say, is what I’m talking about!