Posts Tagged ‘Cabela’s’

National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic Show Guide A to Z

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

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National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic runs Friday, February 14th through Sunday, February 16th at the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee. In addition to more than 300 exhibitors, there will be seven seminar stages with hourly presentations. The event is presented by MidwayUSA.

Antler sheds. Looking to keep your bird dog busy this offseason? Renowned trainer Tom Dokken is revolutionizing the sport of using dogs to hunt for sheds and presenting at National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic.

Benelli has introduced the new Ethos shotgun for 2014, and you can get your first look at it at National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic.

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New for 2014, the Benelli Ethos.

Cabela’s, World’s Foremost Outfitter, longtime Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever supporter, is presenting sponsor of Rudy’s Youth Village at the show.

Delmar Smith. “To train like a pro…you’ve got to think like a dog.” Well, Delmar has 75 years of experience thinking like a dog, and you can catch up with him on the “Ask the Experts” panel at the Bird Dog Bonanza Stage.

Expert dog trainers. When Delmar Smith, Ronnie Smith, Tom Dokken, Jim Moorehouse and Bob West form a panel for you to ask questions, that’s a combined 260 years of dog training know-how. Each day on the Bird Dog Bonanza Stage.

Free, as in wildlife habitat management plan. Stop by the Landowner Habitat Help Room at the show and you can consult with a wildlife professional about conservation options for your property from anywhere in the country.

Griffons. Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are growing in popularity perhaps faster than any other sporting breed. Learn more at the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Club of America booth.

Habitat. Pheasants Forever’s tagline is “The Habitat Organization.” If your passion is improving habitat for pheasants, quail and other wildlife, the Habitat Hall group of exhibitors is a must.

Is your mouth watering? Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever are hosting their own “top chefs” at the show, including wild game chefs Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore  and David Draper of Field and Stream’s The Wild Chef blog.

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See Hank Shaw on the Wild Game Cooking Stage.

J&L Boykins is one of the man bird dog exhibitors at the show. Check out all the bird dog breeds at the Bird Dog Alley.

K9…you can bet there are a couple of exhibitors listed under this letter/number combo.

Life Membership. Make the ultimate commitment to conservation by becoming a Pheasants Forever Life Member. Visit the Pheasants Forever booth by the show floor main entrance.

Missing. If you’re tired of it, then it’s time for a new gun. Check out all the top makers on the show floor: Benelli, Beretta, Browning…

Native grasslands can offer quality nesting cover for pheasants. Come to the Habitat Stage and learn about diversifying and improving this critical habitat.

Outdoor apparel. Start at the Pheasants Forever MarketPlace on the show floor for your Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever-logoed gear. Your product purchases here support wildlife habitat conservation.

Pollinator habitat. What does it have to do with pheasants and quail? Check out the presentations on the Habitat Stage.

Quail are Scott Linden’s favorite bird to hunt. Stop by the Wingshooting USA booth and meet the venerable television host who’s an expert on bobwhite and western quail species.

Rudy the Rooster is Pheasants Forever’s youth mascot. Visit the Youth Village area of the show and get your picture taken with him.

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Bird dog breeders and bird dog training seminars are the most popular attractions at National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic.

Smith, as in Delmar, Rick and Ronnie. National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic is a rare opportunity to see the three from this legendary dog training family at the same event.

Training. E-Collars. GPS. Pointers. Puppies. Retrievers. Spaniels. If you can name it, you’ll find a how-to on it.

U.S. Bank presents Pheasants Forever’s Visa Card. Stop by their booth, sign up for their card and receive either a hardcover wild game recipe book, a green PF shooters bag or a chance on a Tri-Star Setter 12 gauge shotgun.

Vegan-turned-hunter Tovar Cerulli, author of The Mindful Carnivore, provides a unique perspective on the Wild Game Cooking Stage.

Wingshooting from the good ‘ol days with the L.C. Smith Collectors Association and the Parker Gun Collectors Association.

X marks your next upland hunting spot, and the tourism divisions from the likes of Kansas, Nebraska and South Dakota, plus regional tourism representatives and guides and outfitters are here help you book your dream trip.

Yum… Hank Shaw is a hunter, chef, blogger and author of Hunt, Gather, Cook – Finding the Forgotten Feast. See him on the Wild Game Cooking Stage.

Zero-turn lawnmowers. Check out Wisconsin-based – and Pheasants Forever national sponsor, Scag Power equipment, one of more than 300 exhibitors at the show.

Field Notes are compiled by Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauckPF.

See the Complete National Pheasant Fest 2014 Seminar Schedule

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

Rick Smith is one of many legendary bird dog trainers presenting at National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic.

Rick Smith is one of many legendary bird dog trainers presenting at National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic.

Before heading to the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee for National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic Feb. 14-16, view the complete seminar schedule and plan which presentations to attend. There will be seven seminar stages for upland enthusiasts to choose from, with concurrent seminars running on-the-hour throughout the three-day weekend. The event is presented by MidwayUSA. Highlights include:

Bird Dog Bonanza Stage. Between six panel experts – Delmar Smith, Rick Smith, Ronnie Smith, Tom Dokken, Josh Miller and Bob West – this dog stage hosts more than 260 years of combined training experience. Includes presentations on “Basic Obedience Training and Starting Your Dog Off Right,” “Remote Training and Tracking Your Dog with GPS,” “Shed Antler Hunting – Train Your Dog to Help You Find More Sheds” and a question-and-answer session with a panel of experts. The Bird Dog Bonanza Stage is presented by Purina and SportDOG.

Wild Game Cooking Stage. The cooking stage will feature presentations by authors Hank Shaw and Tovar Cerruli as well as David Draper of Field and Stream magazine. Session titles include “Getting the Most of Your Upland Birds for the Table,” “Preparing Wild Game from the Tailgate,” ”From Tough to Tender, Making the Most of your Venison Cuts” and “The Mindful Carnivore – A Vegetarian’s Hunt for Sustenance.”

Habitat Stage. The habitat presentations include “The Food Plot Establishment and Management for White-tailed Deer and Pheasants, Best Practices,” “Landscape Scale Habitat Efforts – The History of Pheasants in Wisconsin,” “Pheasant Management” and “Pollinators and Great Upland Wildlife Habitat.” The Habitat Stage is presented by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the USDA Farm Service Agency and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Additional seminar stages include the Upland Hunting Stage (featuring the likes of Scott Linden from Wingshooting USA), the Building Habitat Forever stage, the Get into the Hunt stage and Rudy’s Youth Village stage presented by Cabela’s.

All seminars are free upon admittance to the show.

Field Notes are compiled by Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauckPF.

Field Report: Out West Action in Nebraska

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Brad Lines, left, president of Nebraska’s High Plains PF chapter, and his two smooth wirehairs “Ava,” left, and “Jade,” and Pheasants Forever Journal Editor Mark Herwig and his springer, “Hunter,”  after a successful hunt near the Colorado border (buttes in background) Nov. 24.

Brad Lines, left, president of Nebraska’s High Plains PF chapter, and his two smooth wirehairs “Ava,” left, and “Jade,” and Pheasants Forever Journal Editor Mark Herwig and his springer, “Hunter,” after a successful hunt near the Colorado border (buttes in background) Nov. 24.

There’s still plenty of pheasant action to be had in this country, and in this season too.

Last week, I was on the Nebraska-Colorado border with the High Plains Pheasants Forever chapter near Sidney, Nebraska. Chapter president Brad Lines, an enthusiastic hunter and conservationist, suggested I spend an extra morning with him instead of driving home right away to Minnesota. I’d spent the previous day with the chapter for an upcoming story for the Pheasants Forever Journal, PF’s official print magazine.

I thought, well, driving vs. hunting…okay, I’ll hunt. Besides, Brad said, the scenery is beautiful. Right he was. There’s a line of continuous and broken buttes running north and south that, combined with the endless, treeless prairie, cut a pretty picture to this son of the dark northern forest. Some of the buttes ended in steep, dramatic cliffs where one herd of some 20 mule deer scurried toward as we drove by. Brad scored a nice antelope buck near here earlier in the season.

We jumped a few sharptails long on some Nebraska Open Fields and Waters land (private walk-in sites), but missed on a few long shots. Brad, an associate category manager for rod and reels with Sidney-based Cabela’s, then took me to chapter member Brian Sprenger’s CRP project on the Nebraska-Colorado border. The field included a large sorghum/green feed food plot. I had a good feeling about this one.

Brad said this was mainly a sharpie site, with a chance of pheasants too. “Hunter,” my springer, pushed up a few sharpies, but I was bent over looking for tracks. Combined with my ear plugs, I never had a shot by the time I heard Brad calling me out. At drive’s end, we met up to chat.

I noticed Hunter still working the cover, but didn’t take a stance. All of a sudden, he started putting up pheasants left and right. Brad and I each missed roosters before I dropped a slow learner close in.

On the next drive, sharpies, one flock 20-strong, were flushing pretty regularly, albeit most way long. Brad dropped one of the roosters we missed earlier and a sharpie on the way back over his smooth coats “Ava” and “Jade.”

“Joining” us at hunt’s end was Nebraska Game and Parks Commission (NGPC) Conservation Officer Sean McKeehan, who after checking our licenses, graciously agreed to take our photo, above. NGPC is an important habitat conservation partner with the local chapter and Pheasants Forever.

One last treat: Brad took me to a M.O.N. (middle of nowhere) smoke house, the Hot Spot, just over the border in Peetz, Colorado. While the place was out of half of everything (it was Sunday afternoon), what it did have left was great stuff (pulled pork, ribs and some killer chopped BBQ green beans)! I filled my belly and headed northeast for home, pleased that in a time of declining habitat and bird numbers, there is still some great shooting to be had and must-see places out in pheasant country.

Read about this hunt in its entirety in an upcoming edition of the Pheasants Forever Journal. Not a member? Join today.

The Nomad is written by Mark Herwig, Editor of the Pheasants Forever Journal and Quail Forever Journal. Email Mark at mherwig@pheasantsforever.org.

This is My Classic Shotgun: Pre WWII Webley & Scott

Monday, January 7th, 2013

Matt Hover, his classic Webley & Scott and his German shorthair, “Stella,” teamed up for this rooster near Beaver City in southwest Nebraska.

Matt Hover, his classic Webley & Scott and his German shorthair, “Stella,” teamed up for this rooster near Beaver City in southwest Nebraska.

In the Hover family, it was something of a family tradition that a gun was passed down from father to son on a special occasion. So when Matt Hover earned his Master’s Degree in 2004, the only question was if the shotgun would be shiny new or a classic double.

“Coming back from a fly fishing trip in Wyoming, we decided to stop at Cabela’s in Sidney, Nebraska,” Hover said, “While I was checking out the new Citoris, my dad went into the gun library and a Webley & Scott caught his eye. He and I both agreed that giving a classic old gun a new life was better than a brand new weapon, so that’s what we did.”

Hover’s English double sees field action each year – typically early season when the shots are close over “Stella,” his 5-year-old German shorthaired pointer – and has brought him even more meaning as the years have passed. “I never plan to get rid of this gun, as my dad, who was always my main hunting partner, is in the advanced stages of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (he was diagnosed at age 58, he’s now 62) and he hasn’t been able to hunt for a few years now. I terribly miss being able to have him hunt with me, but I will always carry great memories, especially using that Webley.”

Do you have a classic shotgun with a story to tell? Email a photo to Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor, at ahauck@pheasantsforever.org.

New PF-Logoed Prairie Storm 100 Round Carry Pack

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

New for pheasant hunters this fall from Federal Premium Ammunition is a 100 round carry pack of the Prairie Storm pheasant load – perfect for any Rooster Road Trip.

The large packs are available at Cabela’s, and only in lead shot (the hunters on Pheasants Forever’s Rooster Road Trip will be shooting only the new Prairie Storm steel, as to avoid regulatory confusion when hunting five states in five days, including an assortment of public areas). But if your own Rooster Road Trip includes many hunters or many days, or both, the carry pack could be just the ticket.

In line with all of Federal Premium’s Prairie Storm products, this bulk pack is emblazoned with a Pheasants Forever logo, meaning with each box sold, a donation will be made to Pheasants Forever in support of the organization’s wildlife habitat conservation efforts.

Follow Pheasants Forever’s Rooster Road Trip 2011 at www.RoosterRoadTrip.org, on Facebook , YouTube, and Twitter (#rrt11). 

The Prairie Storm 100 round carry pack.

Anthony’s Antics Afield is written by Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauck.

Breaking in Upland Hunting Boots

Monday, October 10th, 2011

Pheasant hunting opens in Minnesota and South Dakota on October 15th, and I can hardly wait! I’ve been going through my gear for weeks and everything is looking good. One of my key pieces of gear is boots. A long day in the field can be a long, miserable day in the field with the wrong pair of boots.

I recently purchased a new pair of upland boots from Cabela’s, the new Cabela’s 400 Gram Ultralight Hunter Boots by Meindl. Right now the boots are brand new in the box, and I have made the mistake of not breaking in a boot before a hunt – once.

Breaking in new hunting boots is key to comfort and a long day in the field. There are several things I do PRIOR to the season to make sure my feet and boots won’t let me down:

  • Initially wear them for short periods of time around the house and office (key, it is very difficult to return used dirty boots)
  • Wear them with my hunting socks
  • They may be a little stiff at first, if this does not subside you may need to get a different size
  • Gradually increase the duration of time and distance you wear your boots on dog walks and during yard work
  • As soon as I notice a small pain I, take the boots off for a bit and take it slow as small problems can quickly lead to larger ones.

The key here is to TAKE YOUR TIME when you break in your new boots and they should give you years of service.

These are just a few tips. Do any of you shooters have tips on what works for you when breaking in boots?

The Pheasant Fest blog is written by Brad Heidel, Pheasants Forever’s Director of Corporate and Special Event Sales. Look for Brad’s column, “The Gun Shop,” in the Pheasants Forever Journal.

Gun Review: Cabela’s 50th Anniversary Edition Browning Citori Superlight Feather

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

For those of you that have read the “Gun Shop” column in Pheasants Forever Journal in the past, you already know I am a big fan of classic Browning Shotguns. I saved tips for my first A-5. The Browning Citori is no exception. My first student loan helped me get my Citori. Seems I am not alone in my admiration of this iconic powerhouse.

Cabela’s also feels the Citori embodies classic tradition with style and speed, so much so that they have worked with Browning to develop the Cabela’s 50th Anniversary shotgun. They started with the Citori Superlight Feather 12 gauge as the base to start with and customized from there. The base model comes with a straight English stock and a lightweight alloy receiver. Both keep the weight down while making the gun extremely fast handling, always a bonus on a rocketing rooster! That said, you could not just throw some engraving on this and call it special or a collector piece.

The Cabela's 50th Anniversary edition Browning Citori Superlight Feather

What makes this Citori different from the standard Superlight? The first thing you will notice is the beautiful wood used in the stock and the forearm. This Citori has stepped up to a Grade VII wood. For the barrels they also kicked it up a notch by adding 2” to the barrels, which I felt really gave this Superlight a smooth swing. The weight not only makes this Citori quick but also a dream to carry for a full day in the field.  The upgrade in the wood and longer barrels makes this a truly unique Citori. But they did not stop there. The Cabela’s 50th Anniversary logo is also engraved on the bottom of the receiver, giving this gun an extra touch of class without making it gaudy. Top that off with a very limited production run of only 200 and you have a true collectable firearm.

This gun is one that you would be proud to own. With a price tag at $2999 – only $600 above MSRP of a standard Citori Superlight Feather – you have the choice to hide it in the safe or, better yet, get out on a bright fall day and bag yourself a couple roosters. It looks like I may have to save a few more tips, or go back to school…

The Pheasant Fest blog is written by Brad Heidel, Pheasants Forever’s Director of Corporate and Special Event Sales. Look for Brad’s column, “The Gun Shop,” in the Pheasants Forever Journal.