Posts Tagged ‘cooking pheasants’

Recipe: Pheasant Harvest Soup

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Pheasant Harvest Soup ready to serve. Photo by Bob St.Pierre / Pheasants Forever

Pheasant Harvest Soup ready to serve. Photo by Bob St.Pierre / Pheasants Forever

I realize pheasant breasts are the “Holy Grail” of wild game succulence, but don’t overlook a rooster’s thighs and legs. And for goodness sake, don’t just breast the bird and garbage the remainder. Pheasant legs are certainly tougher to cook, but a rooster’s legs and thighs actually produce quite a lot of tasty dark meat when handled with care.

Perhaps the easiest way to put those pheasant legs to good use is in soup.  As I’ve written before, I enjoy spending my summer in the garden. Consequently, I find great pleasure in marrying early season roosters with late harvested garden veggies.

While I’m not skilled in making my own stock, this soup recipe is tasty and simple.

Ingredients

  • 2 sets of pheasant legs
  • ½ cup of wild rice
  • 3 cups of sliced carrots (I am a fan of planting multi-colored carrots in my garden)
  • 2 cups of diced potatoes
  • 2 sliced jalepenos
  • ½ cup of Petey’s original seasoning (substitute your favorite soup seasoning or boullion cubes)
  • 1 cup of broccoli
  • 1 cup of Brussels sprouts

Steps

1)      Start by slow boiling the pheasant legs in water for roughly 15 minutes / or slow cooking in a crock pot for an hour.

2)      Remove the legs from the broth and let cool.

3)      Reduce the remaining broth to simmer.

4)      Cook wild rice for 45 minutes in broth on medium simmer.

5)      Add Petey’s spice to broth.

6)      Add carrots and potatoes to the broth after wild rice has cooked for 30 minutes.

7)      After the pheasant legs have cooled, pick the meat off the bones being careful to remove any BBs, feathers and tendons from the lower leg meat.

8)      Add the pulled leg meat to the soup.

9)      Simmer the soup on low, stirring occasionally for about 30 minutes as the flavors mix together.

10)  Dish the soup into bowls on top of fresh broccoli and Brussels sprouts.  This will ensure these green veggies stay crunchy and retain their color.

11)  Serve with your favorite soup cracker.

This preparation is definitely not fancy, but it’s certainly not difficult.  And I promise, you’ll be surprised at how much you’ll begin looking forward to saving the legs from future roosters.

 

The Pointer is written by Bob St.Pierre, Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever’s Vice President of Marketing.  Follow Bob on Twitter @BobStPierre and listen to Bob and Billy Hildebrand every Saturday morning on FAN Outdoors radio on KFAN FM100.3.

Wild Game, It’s what’s For Dinner

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

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“Hunters are increasingly motivated by meat,” that’s the headline of a report released on Wednesday by Responsive Management, an international survey research firm. According to their findings, the percentage of hunters identifying “for the meat” as the most important reason for hunting participation rose from 22 percent in 2006 up to 35 percent during this year’s study.

The report attributes the 13 percent climb to three factors; 1) the recession, 2) the locavore movement and 3) the increased participation of females in hunting. Summarizing the findings, Responsive Management concludes our country’s economic downturn has reinvigorated people’s food acquisition through hunting because of its relative affordability (they obviously haven’t accompanied me to Gander Mountain). Their research also indicates women have a slightly greater propensity to choose “for the meat” as a motivation over their male counterparts.

While I agree the economy and gender have played a role in the rise of wild game meat motivation, it’s the “locavore movement” I believe has had the most influence in this quest for game meats. As I look across “pop culture;” from television to magazines to books to restaurants.  I see prime time shows featuring Andrew Zimmern on a squirrel hunt, I see Hank Shaw’s books climbing Amazon’s best sellers list, I read about Lily Raff McCaulou leading Elle magazine on a rabbit hunt and I see restaurant menus featuring quail eggs.  Further, almost every episode of the hugely popular Duck Dynasty series ends with a family dinner around a plate of frog legs or mallard breasts. In fact, I believe this new embrace of wild meats is fostering a greater understanding of hunting across society.

While I’m certain Aldo Leopold never would have imagined Zimmern’s propensity for bug-eating, I do think Zimmern and today’s other locavore leaders can attribute their local food roots direct to Leopold’s 1949 philosophy from A Sand County Almanac:

“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm.  One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.” – Aldo Leopold

The obvious hope of organizations like Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever is today’s locavore trend will take one additional step toward Leopold’s writings – wildlife habitat conservation. Whether you favor beef or venison, chicken or pheasant, the common connector is our land. It is my belief society’s need for food and water will someday soon change our seemingly insatiable appetite to tile our uplands and drain our wetlands.  Or to put it more plainly, local food will lead to local conservation.

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The Pointer is written by Bob St.Pierre, Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever’s Vice President of Marketing.  Follow Bob on Twitter @BobStPierre and listen to Bob and Billy Hildebrand every Saturday morning on FAN Outdoors radio on KFAN FM100.3.