Posts Tagged ‘James Meger’

“Before the Storm” Named Pheasants Forever’s 2013-2014 Print of the Year

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

Before-the-Storm_PF-POY-2013-2014_Storm_small

Scot Storm’s “Before the Storm” has been selected as Pheasants Forever’s 2013-2014 Print of the Year.

The Minnesota-based Storm has earned numerous awards and recognition for his wildlife art, including the 2004 Federal Duck Stamp. Storm’s “Rooster Ridge” was Pheasants Forever’s 2009-2010 Print of the Year, and his “Legacy” series helped raise thousands of dollars for Pheasants Forever’s Build a Wildlife Area program.

Since 1984 (two years after Pheasants Forever’s formation), Pheasants Forever has selected an annual Print of the Year – limited-edition prints that local Pheasants Forever chapters have used to raise funds for their area conservation efforts. Artists including Jim Hautman, Robert Hautman, the late James Meger (a record six Pheasants Forever Print of the Year selections), Rosemary Millette and more have contributed to Pheasants Forever’s wildlife habitat mission as Print of the Year artists.

Before the Storm” is signed and numbered in a limited-edition of 1,000 prints, and will be available at Pheasants Forever chapter banquets throughout the next year. It is also available through Pheasants Forever’s MarketPlace framed or unframed.

Field Notes are compiled by Anthony Hauck, Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauckPF.

Hautman’s “Full House” Named Pheasants Forever’s 30th Anniversary Print

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Robert Hautman’s “Full House” has been selected as Pheasants Forever’s 30th Anniversary Print of the Year. “Full House” is signed and numbered in an edition of 1,000 prints and will be available at Pheasants Forever chapter banquets this autumn and next spring.

“Full House,” Pheasants Forever’s 30th Anniversary Print of the Year

Since 1984 (two years after Pheasants Forever’s formation), Pheasants Forever has selected an annual Print of the Year – limited-edition prints that local Pheasants Forever chapters have used to raise funds for their area conservation efforts. Artists including Jim Hautman (Robert’s brother), the late James Meger (a record six Pheasants Forever Print of the Year selections), Scot Storm, Rosemary Millette and more have contributed to Pheasants Forever’s wildlife habitat mission as Print of the Year artists.

Hautman’s “Full House” draws on his more than 30 years of pheasant hunting experience, and was inspired by a recent South Dakota trip where the ringnecks were plentiful against a backdrop of rich habitat and cool-looking old barns and buildings.

In addition to its availability at Pheasants Forever chapter events, the 30th Anniversary Print of the Year is available unframed at $155, framed at $335 and in holiday cards (25-count with envelopes). To order, call Pheasants Forever toll free at (877) 773-8073.

Field Notes are compiled by Anthony Hauck Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauckPF.

The Legacy of Wildlife Artist James Meger

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

Meger's "Storm Break" was Pheasants Forever's Print of the Year in 2001-2002.

Over his 30-year-plus painting career, wildlife artist James Meger became synonymous with Pheasants Forever, as his creations were selected as Pheasants Forever Prints of the Year more times – six – than any other. Meger passed away last week after a battle with cancer.

Even at Pheasants Forever’s beginnings, Meger built a connection to “The Habitat Organization.” Pheasants Forever’s first goal was passing the Minnesota Pheasant Habitat Stamp bill. The Pheasant Stamp is required of all Minnesota pheasant hunters ages 18 through 64, and sales generate money for habitat enhancement efforts on both public and private lands in the pheasant range of Minnesota. But the stamp also opened the door for artists to compete to have their work featured, and Meger’s work graced Minnesota’s third such stamp in 1986.

Since 1984, Pheasants Forever has also selected an annual Print of the Year, limited-edition prints that local Pheasants Forever chapters have used to raise funds for their area conservation efforts. Meger has been selected as Pheasants Forever’s Print of the Year artist more times than any other, including:

Year                Print

1989-90           Homestead

1997-98           Thanks Be Given

1999-2000       The Pumpkin Patch

2000-2001       Pony Express

2001-2002       Storm Break

2003-2004       Forever Pheasants

Meger was selected as Pheasants Forever's Print of the Year artist six times.

These prints raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, and not just in Minnesota. While best known in his native state – Meger was from Lyon County in southwest Minnesota’s pheasant country – his signature style separated him in an era rich with talented wildlife artists, and distinguished him at Pheasants Forever banquets from Indiana to Idaho.

“James Meger’s artwork was, without question, the most popular among our members,” says Ben Streitz, Pheasants Forever’s Director of Special Markets who worked with Meger in organizing print fundraising efforts since 1996, “He was the master of painting the modern farmstead with family, habitat and pheasants. His trademark was to hide all types of critters inside his paintings. People would just love looking for all the hidden animals. At a Pheasants Forever banquet you just had to look at the where the prints were lined up; there would always be a crowd surrounding his work.”

Messages for the Meger family can be left at www.caringbridge.org/visit/jamesmeger.

Field Notes are written and compiled by Anthony Hauck Pheasants Forever’s Online Editor. Email Anthony at AHauck@pheasantsforever.org and follow him on Twitter @AnthonyHauck.

Admiring the Pheasant Paintings of Maynard Reece and Les Kouba

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

The 1976 Maynard Reece print now hanging above my desk.

The modest PF & QF office building.

I moved offices at Pheasants Forever earlier this week.  Like most people, I wasn’t enthused about packing up my desk and hauling it across the building only to unpack everything again.  However, I was pleasantly surprised at how productive the move actually turned out to be for me.  Not only did I unearth dust bunnies, I uncovered file folders that had not been opened in years.  It’s incredible how little I rely on paper files today compared to 2003 when I started at PF.  Time certainly marches forward.  The same statement can be made about pheasant art.

After unpacking all my work documents, I took the move as an opportunity to freshen up the art on my office walls.  As you can imagine, we have a seemingly unlimited supply of pheasant and quail paintings to choose from in the warehouse.  As I re-examined the scenes beautifully captured by the Hautman brothers, James Meger, Rosemary Millette, Scot Storm, and so many other talented artists, I came to a personal revelation about pheasant art – I like the “old school” paintings the best.

The new wall in my office features pheasants and Alan Trammell.

I know, I know; “old school” doesn’t offer a very good description of what I’m referring to, so let me be more specific.  When I look at the paintings of Les Kouba and Maynard Reece for example, the colors seem to be softer and the birds aren’t necessarily in proportion to the landscape or other objects in the scene.  When you look at a Reece print, you can just tell it’s older and the roosters in Kouba’s print are as big as tractors; all 13 of them.  Maybe what I see, and like, is faded colors and aged yellowing paper.  That could very well be the case; I haven’t carbon dated the prints in the office.  Beauty is an individual decision.  That’s the point of art, isn’t it?  In any event, a Maynard Reece print from 1976 now hangs over my desk. 

Who is your favorite pheasant artist?

The Pointer is written by Bob St.Pierre, Pheasants Forever’s Vice President of Marketing.